3 Tips for Editing Landscapes

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Today, in my new Tip of the Week series, I have three tips I recommend using when editing landscape photos inside of ON1 Photo RAW 2018.5. I can say with confidence that these three tips will quickly turn any landscape photo into a stunning scene. So consider using these three tools when you start to edit any landscape photo as you will likely find that they make a big difference in your edited photos.

These may seem obvious to some but are also a good reminder for those looking for a good starting point in their photo editing. I’ll quickly show how using the crop tool, Dynamic Contrast, and Color Enhancer are three tools to have under your belt when processing landscape photos using ON1 Photo RAW.

1. The Crop Tool
The crop tool will allow you to maximize your subject in your frame and will help you remove distractions very easily. It will also let you level your photo which will straighten your picture if you were shooting handheld. Did you know you could still level your photo outside the crop box?

2. The Color Enhancer Filter
The Color Enhancer filter is an excellent tool for editing colors in your landscape photos. While you can quickly adjust color using the Color Adjustment pane in the Develop module, I find using the Color Enhancer Filter in Effects is much more flexible. In Effects, you can mask and blend any of the adjustments you make, so they apply only to the areas you want them. Using this filter in Effects will give more natural-looking results when editing.

3. Dynamic Contrast
Dynamic Contrast is by far one of the most popular photo editing tools in ON1 Photo RAW 2018 for landscape photos. It allows you to control the detail of your photos so you can make your subject come to life with micro contrast and pop with detail.

5 comments on “3 Tips for Editing Landscapes”

  1. On July 10, 2018 at 9:56 pm JUSTIN SIGALOS wrote:

    When you’re painting in that dynamic contrast mask, is there a way to see your paint strokes? In your example it looks hard to tell exactly where you’re masking.

    1. On July 16, 2018 at 7:15 pm Bruce Wagner replied:

      at the top – under “mask” click “show mask” or on a mac – control-m. Under “view mode” I use “Red overlay”. Hopefully this is what you are looking for.

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